Hatcheries In the Peconics – HIP

The renovation and retrofitting of Hatcheries in the Peconics (HIP), beginning with the Shinnecock Nation’s hatchery in Southampton, NY will be designed and constructed to meet the highest standards of sustainability and resiliency. The goal will be to meet USGBC LEED Platinum standards, carbon neutral in the construction stage, low carbon in the operations stage, net-zero energy, and energy independent during outages.

HIP will be living laboratories, using the retrofit process, to carry out research, education, training, and application of transformational technologies, management practices, and operational know-how. Indigenous knowledge will be critical to the building process. We will apply this knowledge by improving upon existing sustainability criteria to increase resilience. Each phase of HIP will improve upon previous stages to maximize lessons learned and improve criteria for resiliency in building.

Historic Cooperation Announcement

Historic Cooperation Announcement

Expected outcomes of HIP are reducing greenhouse gas emissions, promoting economic development in our region, and going beyond sustainability to define resilient buildings. Secondary outcomes include doubling the amount of shellfish productivity within 3 years from the completion of the project, a shellfish marketing program, and a shellfish shell recycling program.

The urgency of now was underscored by Superstorm Sandy, atmospheric CO2 concentrations reached 400 ppm in 2013 for the first time in millions of years, and concerns of a 4°C worldwide temperature increase. We are compelled to advance systems and knowledge on the science and engineering of resilience and sustainability; for preparedness, response and recovery from extreme climate changes impacting the linked built and natural systems; and integrating this gained knowledge into education, training, and application.

The Shinnecock Nation is in need of new infrastructure and job creation or training to combat unemployment and poverty. Long Island has an abundance of natural beauty but the threat of declining tourism due to environmental issues, such as water quality. Shellfish aquaculture and enhancement directly address these issues. Due to their natural ability as filter feeders, shellfish enhance water quality by filtering water of excess nutrients which may lead to harmful algal blooms which can then yield waterways off limits to shellfishing/swimming.

Click here to download Memorandum of Understanding between Shinnecock Indian Nation and Peconic Institute in PDF Format.

Tribal Trustee Taobi Silva kicks off the Historic Cooperation Agreement.

Tribal Trustee Taobi Silva kicks off the Historic Cooperation Agreement.